The scientific monitoring period of the Scottish Beaver Trial came to an end in May 2014. In June 2015, Scottish Natural Heritage published the Beavers in Scotland Report.

On 24 November 2016, the Scottish Government made the landmark announcement that beavers are to remain in Scotland. For more information, please read the joint press release issued by RZSS and the Scottish Wildlife Trust.

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Virtual guided tour

Experience the sights and sounds of the Scottish Beaver Trial and Knapdale Forest in this virtual guided tour.

Follow Education Ranger, Olwen Hemmings, on a journey from the Barnluasgan Information Centre down to the loch side. Discover exactly where to look for beaver field signs including felled trees, gnawed branches and chew sticks - all with teeth marks! Explore the beaver dam, Knapdale’s beautiful vantage points and all the other wildlife that shares this habitat.

Inspired to visit?

A visit to the Scottish Beaver Trial is a fun, educational and unique day out.

Click here to plan your visit to the Scottish Beaver Trial.
Click here to download a copy of the Visitor's Guide.  

Looking to learn?

Click here to discover the resources available for schools in our Learning Zone.
Use these materials in the classroom or during a visit to Knapdale Forest.

Click here to download fun, family activities to enjoy during your visit.

Want to see more?

Click here to see the Knapdale beavers and the Trial field team in action.

Project partners

The Royal Zoological Society of ScotlandScottish Wildlife Trust
Forestry Commission Scotland

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Comments of support

"I welcome the return of beavers to Knapdale. Beavers are fascinating creatures famed for their industrious habits, and their arrival to Knapdale is certainly creating a booming industry for local businesses." - Local businessman Darren Dobson, owner of the Cairnbaan Hotel

With thanks to

Beaver Trial Supporters
People's Postcode Lottery
PTES

See our other supporters

The Royal Zoological Society of ScotlandScottish Wildlife Trust